Reflections from STEMx13, The First International STEM Web Conference!

Efforts are under-weigh to produce a new generation of K12 STEM leaders within the US K12 public education institution.  Last week I was fortunate to learn from top international STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)  leaders and contribute about a rural STEAM research project located in Dublin, Texas.   Why is STEM important?  It is estimated that 854,000 professional IT jobs will be added to the US economy between 2006 and 2016, which is a 26% increase in IT jobs (Batts & Lesko, 2011) .

Here are my take aways from STEMx13.

  • The Maker Movement is REAL and kids LOVE it!

One way to get kids excited and engage in STEM is to challenge kids to create!  The Maker Movement is centered on imagination.  Some resources that teacher may want to check out include the following:

http://makezine.com/maker-camp/

http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/20/opinion/bare-make-things-teaching/index.html?sr=sharebar_twitter

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/23/is-maker-faire-made-for-kids/?utm_content=bufferc1ea0&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Buffer

http://makezine.com/2013/08/16/mit-welcomes-makers/

To learn more about rural fabrication printing programs an integration programs, please view my presentation!  

Fabrication and Technology Integration Approaches in US Rural Middle Schools

  • STEM is a great way to connect all K12 stakeholders.

Everyone is excited about STEM.  Museums, non-profits, entrepreneurs, K12 education leadership, teachers, parents, and students connect and collaborate when STEM initiatives occur.  Tap into the many STEM networks and professional development opportunities.  Check out the STEMx Recordings:  http://stemxcon.com/page/2013-recordings and get connected.

  • Girls:  We need to engage girls!

It is time to tap into new brain power, and girls are unrepresented in STEM courses and STEM career pathways.  Check out these resources:

http://techkim.wikispaces.com/girlsintech

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/09/how-to-grab-and-keep-girls-interest-in-computer-coding/?utm_content=bufferab2ee&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Buffer

  • We need a generation of K12 student literate in Computer Science.  Is it time to mandate computer science as a mandatory course?

Some resources to share with students who are interested in computer science include the following.

http://www.cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/csfieldguide/student/index.html

http://computerscienceclub.org/

http://csunplugged.org/activities

Let’s keep the STEM conversation going.  Join me on Sunday, Sept. 29, from 8-9 PM at #TXEDUCHAT.  We will discuss STEM initiatives, STEAM resources, and collaborate on how to bets approach meeting the many national and state STEM K12 initiatives.

References:

Batts, D., & Lesko, C. (2011). JETS TEAMS Competitions Builds Future Leaders in STEM Fields. rube.asq.org, (2006), 1–7. Retrieved from http://rube.asq.org/edu/2011/06/best-practices/jets-teams-competition-builds-future-leaders-in-stem-fields.pdf

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About instructionaltechnologist101

Instructional Technologist 1 to 1, Avid change agent, Mac Enthusiastic, Implemented K12 1:1 program, managed offsite curriculum center in community museum, learner, PhD student in Educational Technology at University of North Texas. The future is now! www.why-steam.com

Posted on September 26, 2013, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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